This blog is proudly created By Keith Hackett for Keys to Referee

During a game the referee must always have on his radar when a team go on the attack monitoring the possibility of a DOGSO (Denial of an obvious goal scoring opportunity) offence.

The   referee needs to ensure good proximity to play and to ensure good wide vision so be prepared to

There is a requirement to have a clear understanding of the criteria when an offence takes place and if it is inside or outside the penalty area.

These are the questions you should be asking automatically a process that during the week you can improve through visualisation training or the study of video clips where these types of offences take place.

What is the distance between the offence and the goal?

Is there a likelihood of the player keeping control of the ball?

Is there a likelihood of the player gaining control of the ball?

What is the general direction of play?

How many defenders are involved in the situation?

Where are the defenders located?

Is the offence a direct free kick or an indirect free kick?

If there is no offence, does the player have an obvious opportunity to score a goal?

Does the player deliberately handle the ball to deny the opposing team a goal?

Does the player hold, pull or push an opponent to deny an opponent an obvious goal-scoring opportunity?

Does the player commit an offence inside his/her own penalty area (whilst attempting to play the ball) to deny an opponent an obvious goal-scoring opportunity?

Does the player making the challenge inside own penalty area have a possibility to play the ball and deny an opponent an obvious goal- scoring opportunity?

So please refresh your knowledge of the current law which states.

Where a player denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by a handball offence, the player is sent off wherever the offence occurs.

Where a player commits an offence against an opponent within their own penalty area which denies an opponent an obvious goal-scoring opportunity and the referee awards a penalty kick, the offender is cautioned if the offence was an attempt to play the ball; in all other circumstances (e.g. holding, pulling, pushing, no possibility to play the ball etc.) the offending player must be sent off.

A player, sent-off player, substitute or substituted player who enters the field of play without the required referee’s permission and interferes with play or an opponent and denies the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity is guilty of a sending-off offence.

The following must be considered:

  • Distance between the offence and the goal
  • General direction of the play
  • Likelihood of keeping or gaining control of the ball
  • Location and number of defenders

To improve the accuracy of the decision and the correct sanction applied where appropriate in law.

Thank you for reading this episode of Hacketts Blog .

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Thanks again,

Keith Hackett
Former Head of PGMOL and FIFA REFEREE
keith@keystofootball.com

 

Keith Hackett
Keith Hackett

Keith Hackett is a proud Sheffield Man, Ex FIFA Referee, Former Head of the PGMOL, Author, FA Cup Referee and a Gentleman who knows the laws of the beautiful game in side and out. He is counted amongst the top 100 referees of all time.